i'm just a girl with a blog


Hello! My name is Carson and I'm an American teenage girl. I am naturally very curious, but since I never fell down a rabbit hole to have my own adventure, I'll have to be content with obsessing over movies, books, and TV shows. On this blog expect to find lots of Disney, Sherlock, Once Upon a Time, and Doctor Who. There also may be some Harry Potter, Hunger Games, superheros (I am in love with the Avengers), Star Wars, vloggers, other tv shows, or what ever I feel like, because after all it is my blog. If you follow me, leave me a message. I would love to get to know you.  I'll check out your blog as well.  I hope you enjoy this site, and have a magical day!

RAVENCLAW
{ wear }

Aren’t the stars and stripes a little old-fashioned?

"I’ll turn him into a flea, a harmless little flea. And then I’ll put that flea inside of a box. And I’ll put that box inside of another box. And I’ll send that box to myself. And when it arrives…I’LL SMASH IT WITH A HAMMER!"
— Sylvia Plath (via incorrectsylviaplathquotes)

karlybuggirl:

Ben Wyatt, ladies and gentlemen.


nenilein:

pyrrhaxnikos:

writingfail:

typette:

yo can I drop some advice all you kids trying to get entry level jobs need to learn? I learned it the hard way and now I shall impart that to you.

when you see this shit, that goes “you need like 10 years experience and all this other qualifications nobody with all that would ever apply for a job like this with”, that means one thing: they are weeding out people who don’t believe they can achieve that level. They go “sigh, I can’t even compete, fuck it.” and don’t apply, saving the company the trouble.

What you, as a fresh new student, need to do- is apply anyway with a Luffy-like optimism that you will get that fucking job!! You don’t have a million years experience BUT YOU’LL TRY AND NEVER GIVE UP ETC. You write an opener letter with that in it, submit your shit, and get that goddamn job because they just found somebody who’s willing to give it a try anyway, who has the confidence and the ability to play with the big boys and they will train you to become a master because fresh meat is vital to the industry. 

tldr: APPLY ANYWAY, YOUNG GRASSHOPPER

i really wish i’d read this three months ago

to those who are still looking for their first job: it wouldn’t hurt to try. the worst thing that can happen is that you get a “no”

Also, even if you don’t get the job:

Take time to send a handwritten thank you card. Tell them that you appreciate that they took the time to interview you/look over your résumé, and that if anything pops up, to let you know.

My friend was turned down for an internship with the Blazers but followed up with a letter like that, and two weeks later, they called her saying a spot had opened up and decided to contact her since she said she was still interested.

PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO SEND A NOTE THANKING THEM FOR THEIR TIME EVEN IF YOU DON’T GET THE JOB. Who knows, they might remember you!

Oh god, if I had known that last year…


beastlyworlds:

Parvati and Padma Patil, way late for Wizarding Wednesday, greeting each other in the hallways with their majestic House signs

beastlyworlds:

Parvati and Padma Patil, way late for Wizarding Wednesday, greeting each other in the hallways with their majestic House signs



sheerdisneymagic:

This is approximately when Stitch realized he wanted a family (◕‿◕✿)


were-friends-now-that-ive:

linzeestyle:

scallawag:

image

RDJ, honey, the reason they don’t let you take props home is they’re worried you’d start wandering around in public wearing the Iron Man armor.

^Reblogging because that comment is absolutely true^


fallontonight:

Josh Gad’s daughter is possessed by Frozen!

[ Part 1 / Part 2 ]


jhameia:

playwright-cute:

comeoutofthewoodwork:

fattyforever:

I remember how much her realization that she was “never going to be good enough for him” resonated with me when I first watched this movie. She decided to push herself, not to be with him, but to prove him the fuck wrong.

Strong female role models who can still wear pink and love fashion. Yes yes yes.

I FUCKING LOVE THIS MOVIE OH MY GODDDDDDDDDD

CAN WE JUST STOP FOR A SEC THO?

HE’S INSULTING HER FOR BEING DUMB

SHE GOT INTO THAT SCHOOL ON HER OWN.

WARNER NEEDED HIS DADDY TO CALL THEM TO BE ABLE TO GET IN.

I LOVE THIS MOVIE NO ONE EVEN UNDERSTANDS.

AND he was WAITLISTED. 



claudiablacks:

get to know me meme - [5/5] shows
  ↳ firefly

"Well look at this!  Appears we got here just in the nick of time. What does that make us?"
"Big damn heroes, sir!"
"Well, ain’t we just."

There’s over 9 million users on Tumblr now. Reblog if you’re one of the few who’s never EVER left anon hate in somebody’s ask box.

tiburon5150:

churrosforthewin:

furwolf76:

If you can’t reblog this…

image

NEVER HAVE NEVER WILL

That’s a fucking low number. That’s fucking sad.

I agree


purple-rainbows:

“I have waited for this day for a long, long, long, long, long, long time. I’m not mad it took this long. I know the people at Pixar were busy creating ‘Toy Story 16.’ But the time they took was worth it. The script is fantastic. And it has everything I loved about the first one: It’s got a lot of heart, it’s really funny, and the best part is—it’s got a lot more Dory.”  

—Ellen DeGeneres on Finding Dory


perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]